Assam shows signs of change | Andrews Blog

When we reached the mahout camp, we were told that there were 2 three-year-old elephant calves with their mothers that would arrive from the jungle for us to begin our training. One female called Neela and a male called Monish. In the meantime the mahouts spent time cutting up sugar cane into bite-sized chunks to be used as food rewards, with a few bananas thrown in as well.

Continue Reading

Back to school & health inspections

The great thing about the husbandry of these Government Forestry elephants is that they live in the National Park. They are set free during the night and in the morning they return. They breed this way, the females finding a wild bull in musth when necessary. So this morning Dada was nowhere to be found. He was somewhere within 10 kilometers of forest so a party was sent out to retrieve him. (He arrived of his own accord in the afternoon).

Continue Reading

Return to Assam

October 13 Today is our day of travel from one corner of India to the other in 14 hours. We left our hotel at 4.30 am and then flew from…

Continue Reading

Hasthisiksha!

There were 23 mahouts who arrived for the workshop. Our first task was to find out how much of what they had learned last time had been remembered and utilised. It was encouraging to hear senior mahouts who had been training the traditional way for such a long time telling of their success with using combined reinforcement (mix of positive and negative reinforcement.

Continue Reading
The Temple Festival
Temple-Festival

The Temple Festival

Ben, Ramith (our translator) and myself took an overnight train to the Guruvayoor elephant residence where possibly the world’s largest collection of tuskers (male elephants) are housed. Here live 60 elephants, 56 of which are mature tuskers. The Chief Veterinary officer and a senior mahout gave us a tour of these captive elephants all of whom are used for ceremonial purposes, namely temple festivals.

Continue Reading
Close Menu
×
×

Cart